NAEM 2020

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Netherlands Annual Ecology Meeting

Tuesday 11 & Wednesday 12 February 2020

Conference Centre "De Werelt", Westhofflaan 2, Lunteren, The Netherlands

 
Scope

Each year, on the second Tuesday and Wednesday of February, the Netherlands Ecological Research Network (NERN) organises her annual conference, the Netherlands Annual Ecology Meeting (NAEM). This conference is particularly geared towards people working in the field of ecology and/or evolution. It aims to strengthen the network of ecologists in the Netherlands, Belgium, and surrounding countries and provides an overview of the work carried out by the people in the network. The NAEM meeting is two full days, each day consisting of a plenary session, in which a Dutch/Flemish and an international world leader present their view on a specific topic in ecology or evolution, two sets of five parallel sessions (including more workshop-like sessions), and a poster session. Parallel sessions generally consists of 6 oral presentations, thus leading to a total of approximately 125 oral presentations. On average, we have about 75-100 scientific poster presentations during the meeting. On Tuesday evening, a more relaxed and thought-provoking presentation is generally scheduled. The NAEM meeting is organised in collaboration with the Dutch-Flemish Ecological Society (NecoV) and is financially supported by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO).

This year will be the 13th edition of the Netherlands Annual Ecology Meeting (NAEM). As always, the meeting will be held at Conference Centre "De Werelt" in Lunteren. At this stage, the four plenary speakers have been confirmed. The first plenary session will be about "Soil carbon dynamics in a changing world", with plenary talks by Prof. Henry Janzen of the Lethbridge Research and Development Centre, which is part of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, about "Storing carbon in managed lands: an ecosystem perspective", and by Prof. Rien Aerts of the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, about "Soil carbon dynamics in a changing climate". The second plenary session will be about "Chemical Communication", with plenary talks by Prof. Gabriela Nevitt of the University of California, Davis, and by Prof. Astrid Groot of the University of Amsterdam. More details about the general set-up of the programme and about the deadlines for submission of contributions to the 2020 NAEM meeting can be found below. You are cordially invited to register your participation.

Call for submission of abstracts for an oral presentation in one of the parallel sessions is now open!

The NAEM organising committee has selected the parallel sessions for NAEM 2020. You can find an overview here below. The call for submitting an abstract for an oral presentation in one of the parallel sessions is now open and will be open until TUESDAY 26 NOVEMBER 2019. That gives you 6 weeks to look at the programme, think about the session that you would like to present your work in, make an abstract (max. 200 words!), and submit that along with a title of your proposed talk to the conveners of the session of your choice (their e-mail addresses are hyperlinked in the overview below).

Please take note of the following regarding the submission of presentation abstracts
1. Sessions are led by conveners, who are responsible for filling their session with 6 presentations (15 minutes talk + 5 minutes discussion), one of which is given by one of the conveners or a senior speaker giving the birds-eye view on the topic.
2. Conveners will select the most applicable presentations for their session. Selected and rejected applicants will be informed by the conveners no later than WEDNESDAY 4 DECEMBER 2019.
3. Once again, the deadline for submission of your presentation abstract to the conveners is TUESDAY 26 NOVEMBER 2019.
4. People that wish to give a talk in one of the parallel sessions, are asked to contact the conveners of the session, sending them the following details:
     A. Your full name and those of co-authors to be listed in the programme
     B. Your affiliation (institute + group/department)
     C. The title of the presentation
     D. A short abstract of the presentation that you propose to give (MAX. 200 WORDS)

Presenting a poster during the NAEM meeting

Besides the plenary and parallel sessions, time has been allotted to two poster sessions. Those wanting to present a poster, are asked to indicate this in the registration form on the website. It is possible for you to indicate in the registration form whether or not your poster should be linked to one of the parallel sessions. If so, we will ascertain that your poster is assigned to the poster session that is scheduled on the same day as the parallel session. If you change your plans after registering, please send an email to office@nern.nl to indicate that you will or will not be presenting a poster during the NAEM meeting, and if you will, be sure to give the title of your poster and to indicate whether it should be linked to one of the parallel sessions. Posters presented during the NAEM meeting have to be formatted in PORTRAIT ORIENTATION and in A0-size. At the end of the meeting, the best poster (as judged by the NAEM audience) will be selected and awarded with the NECOV Poster Prize. Deadline for submission of a poster title is: Tuesday 21 January 2020.

Important deadlines
  • Opening call for submissions of proposals for parallel sessions: Tuesday 25 June 2019
  • Deadline for submissions of proposals for parallel sessions: Tuesday 24 September 2019
  • Opening call for submissions of abstracts for an oral presentation in one of the parallel sessions: NOW OPEN
  • Deadline for submissions of abstracts for an oral presentation in one of the parallel sessions: Tuesday 26 November 2019
  • Full programme online: Late November 2019
  • Deadline for submission of poster titles for a slot in one of the poster sessions: Tuesday 21 January 2020
  • Early-bird deadline for registration of participation: Tuesday 21 January 2020
 
Draft Programme

At this moment, the call for submissions of abstracts for an oral presentation in one of the parallel sessions is open. Here below, you can find an overview of the parallel sessions during NAEM 2020, split out per day of the meeting. Please read the instructions above, if you are interested in giving a talk in one of these sessions.

Tuesday 11 February

  1. SESSION LINKED TO PLENARY SESSION ABOUT CHEMICAL ECOLOGY: Chemical communication - Nature's universal language
    Conveners: Thomas Blankers (Department of Evolutionary & Population Biology, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands), Alexander Haverkamp (Laboratory of Entomology, Wageningen University & Research)
    Session highlight: Chemical communication is crucial in the evolution and ecology of animals and plants, mediating many important interactions such as mating, foraging, and pollination. Yet, to the human observer these signals often remain hidden and elusive. This session will showcase examples of chemical communication, demonstrating the vital role these signals play in the interactions between individuals within and among species as well as across biological kingdoms. We therefore encourage talks on the mechanisms and diversity of communication signals across the field of chemical ecology.
  2. TRENDS in Global Change Research
    Conveners: Sietze Norder (Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands), Alexandra van der Geer (Endless Forms, Naturalis Biodiversity Center, the Netherlands)
    Session highlight: Ecosystem assemblage and species distributions are drastically modified by human activities. The aim of this session is to address both drivers and consequences of biodiversity change from local to global scales. In addition, we aim to place ecological changes in the Anthropocene within the context of deep-time ecological dynamics.
  3. TRENDS in Microbiome Research
    Conveners: Ben Oyserman (Microbial Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology, the Netherlands), Viviane Cordovez (Institute Biology Leiden, University of Leiden, the Netherlands)
    Session highlight: Microbiomes have an outsized impact both on a global and local scale. At the global level, microbiomes are one of the primary drivers of ecosystem function and contribute significantly to cycling of nutrients such as nitrogen. On a local scale, microbiome interactions with host organisms may increase the adaptability of the host to stressors such as drought or disease, with direct implications for conservation and movement ecology. This session aims to 1) develop an interdisciplinary exchange of ideas and methods between researchers that investigate the role of microbiomes in ecosystem function and host adaptability, and 2) connect plant and animal researchers with microbiologists to better understand the role of the microbiomes in plant or animal adaptability to global change and stress.
  4. Virus Ecology
    Conveners: Simone Weidner (Microbial Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology, the Netherlands), Adam Ossowicki (Microbial Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology, the Netherlands), and Jan Dirk van Elsas (Microbial Ecology, University of Groningen, the Netherlands)
    Session highlight: Viruses are ubiquitous on Earth, with profound implications for host fitness and ecosystem function as well as for crop, lifestock and human health. Much is known from particular disciplines such as aquatic microbiology and plant pathology, while new research frontiers are emerging in other systems, such as the soil. This session will foster exchange between these perspectives and integration with broader ecological research. All submissions that consider viruses in their ecological context are welcomed.
  5. Marine Benthic Ecology
    Conveners: Anna de Kluijver (Geosciences, Utrecht University, the Netherlands), Tanja Stratmann (Geosciences, Utrecht University, the Netherlands / Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen, Germany), and Martijn Bart (Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands)
    Session highlight: Marine benthic hotspots support high levels of biodiversity and provide many goods and services to society. However, many benthic ecosystems are threatened by anthropogenic activities and climate change. To predict and understand how benthic ecosystems respond to future conditions, knowledge on biogeochemical processes and ecological functioning are essential. This session aims to combine studies from organism to ecosystem level on various benthic ecosystems (e.g., seagrass beds, mangroves, reef-systems) for a broad interdisciplinary exchange.
  6. Movement Ecology
    Conveners: Casper van Leeuwen (Aquatic Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology, the Netherlands), Allert Bijleveld (Coastal Systems, Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, the Netherlands)
    Session highlight: Movement is a key process in ecology, affecting the life history of individuals, populations, communities and ecosystem dynamics. Rapid technological progress in understanding organism movement coincides with a growing need to understand the movement capacity of species facing global changes (e.g. habitat fragmentation, warming, pollution, eutrophication). This session will bring together people studying movement ability and movement requirements of organisms in relation to changing environments. We welcome submissions on all species, habitat types and spatial scales.
  7. Ecology and Conservation
    Conveners: Ignas Heitkönig (Resource Ecology, Wageningen University & Research, the Netherlands), Rascha Nuijten (Animal Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology, the Netherlands)
    Session highlight: In the current time of rapid global change, application of ecological research is of increasing importance. Biodiversity is under severe threat in many areas of the world and the call for action is becoming stronger. In this session we (1) highlight examples of ecological research that have a positive impact on the conservation of a species, habitat or ecosystem, and (2) explore avenues of increasing the impact of ecological research to halt biodiversity declines and ecological degradation.
  8. Nitrogen in Ecosystems
    Conveners: Rik Veldhuis (GELIFES, University of Groningen, the Netherlands), Fons Smolders (Aquatic Ecology and Environmental Biology, Radboud University, the Netherlands)
    Session highlight: Nitrogen emissions are changing our natural areas. One of the effect of nitrogen deposition is the acidification of the soil which alters the biogeochemistry and the microbial composition. In this session we will discuss the effects of these alternations on plants.

Wednesday 12 February

  1. SESSION LINKED TO PLENARY SESSION ABOUT SOIL CARBON BUDGETS: Soil organic matter in a changing environment
    Conveners: Maaike van Agtmaal (Louis Bolk Institute, the Netherlands), Mariet Hefting (Ecology & Biodiversity, Utrecht University, the Netherlands)
    Session highlight: Soil organic matter (SOM) is crucial in many soil-associated ecosystem services. SOM facilitates water retention, nutrient cycling, greenhouse gas mitigation and structural stability of soils. Climate change and land use intensification have major impacts on SOM stability and composition, due to direct changes in environmental conditions and indirect changes in vegetation. This session welcomes research from both natural and managed systems on SOM dynamics in a changing world in relation to soil ecosystems services.
  2. TRENDS in Eco-Evo Dynamics
    Conveners: Aafke Oldenbeuving (Pollinator Ecology, Naturalis Biodiversity Center, the Netherlands), Jelle Zandveld (Institute for Interdisciplinary Studies, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands), Joost van den Heuvel (Laboratory of Genetics, Wageningen University & Research, the Netherlands)
    Session highlight: In nature organisms adapt to all environmental selection pressures that are encountered. While one selection pressure increases a trait, another might decrease it, leading to optimal life histories. Similar phenomena exist at the individual species level for physiological and / or genetic trade-offs. This session aims to discuss the trends in evolutionary dynamics by comparing the dynamics on different levels of organisation.
  3. TRENDS in Biodiversity Research
    Conveners: Patrick Jansen (Resource Ecology, Wageningen University & Research, the Netherlands), Koos Biesmeijer (Pollinator Ecology, Naturalis Biodiversity Center, the Netherlands)
    Session highlight: Decline of biodiversity has quickly developed into one of the most urgent problems of our time, and has been identified as an urgent threat by the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES). The Netherlands, with its high human population density and its intense agriculture and polluting industries, is one of the countries in which these problems are relatively prominent. This session deals with research on trends in biodiversity. Talks may cover recent discoveries, methods, technologies and approaches in biodiversity research, including both the measurement of trends, the identification of the underlying drivers, and the evaluation of potential solutions.
  4. Ecology of Social Behaviour
    Conveners: Martijn Hammers (GELIFES, University of Groningen, the Netherlands), Sjouke Kingma (Animal Behaviour, Wageningen University & Research, the Netherlands)
    Session highlight: Most organisms live in a social environment, and many aspects of their lives are affected by social interactions. Studying how ecological conditions affect cooperation and conflict between individuals is important for understanding life-history evolution, population dynamics and conservation. This session aims to discuss (1) how ecological conditions shape social behaviour and (2) highlight the importance of considering social behaviour in ecological studies.
  5. Recent advances and critical topics in reproductive biology
    Conveners: Melissah Rowe (Animal Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology, the Netherlands), Lyanne Brouwer (Animal Ecology and Physiology, Radboud University, the Netherlands), Yumi Nakadera (Department of Ecological Science, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, the Netherlands), Joris M. Koene (Department of Ecological Science, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, the Netherlands)
    Session highlight: Knowledge of reproductive biology is crucial to our understanding of organismal ecology and evolution. Such knowledge is particularly pertinent in modern times given that rapid environmental changes, such as increasing temperatures and urbanization, are negatively impacting biodiversity on a global scale. This session aims to highlight recent advances in our knowledge of reproductive tactics and processes with a particular focus on understudied taxa, as well highlight the impacts of environmental change on reproductive traits related to fitness in order to stimulate research on these topics.
  6. Herbivores and ecosystem dynamics
    Conveners: Judith Sitters (Department Biology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium), Ciska Veen (Terrestrial Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology, the Netherlands)
    Session highlight: Herbivores are major drivers of the structure and functioning of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. They exert strong influences on plant communities, nutrient cycles and soil/water properties, which all have an impact on the ecology of other organisms and ecosystem processes. This session aims to bring scientists together who are working on a range of herbivores, from invertebrates to elephants, and their impacts on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning.
  7. Network Analysis in Ecology
    Conveners: Pariya Behrouzi (Biometris, Wageningen University & Research, the Netherlands), Romain Frelat (Aquaculture and Fisheries, Wageningen University & Research, the Netherlands), Lia Hemerik (Biometris, Wageningen University & Research, the Netherlands)
    Session highlight: Networks are a powerful tool to represent complex realities and network analysis is applied in a large diversity of fields in ecology, with for example protein networks, pollination networks or food webs. Understanding the structure of networks can help revealing stabilizing mechanisms of communities. This theme session provides an opportunity to examine recent methodological advances in as well as new applications of network analysis in ecology.
  8. Plastics in the Environment
    Conveners: Oscar Franken (Department of Ecological Science, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, the Netherlands), Esperanza Huerta Lwanga (Environmental Science, Wageningen University & Research, the Netherlands)
    Session highlight: Plastic pollution has recently gained a lot of media attention. Yet, the effects these plastics may have in both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems are still largely unknown. Breakdown of larger particles can result in the formation of micro- and nano-plastics, which may affect species in direct and indirect ways. This session aims at bringing together and synthesizing the current ecological knowledge on the effects of plastic pollution in a wide range of ecosystems.
Fees 1
 
  EARLY-BIRD FEE 2 REGULAR FEE 2
MSc students / PhD candidates (2 days, with Bed & Breakfast) € 180,- € 215,-
Others (2 days, with Bed & Breakfast) € 210,- € 250,-
Single room surcharge €   50,- €   50,-
MSc students / PhD candidates (2 days, without Bed & Breakfast) € 160,- € 190,-
Others (2 days, without Bed & Breakfast) € 185,- € 220,-
MSc students / PhD candidates (1-day visitor) € 110,- € 135,-
Others (1-day visitor) € 130,- € 155,-

1 The participation fee includes coffee/tea/water, lunches, and dinners.
2 The Early-Bird Fee applies to anyone who REGISTERS ON OR BEFORE 21 JANUARY 2020 

Note:

  • Availability of hotel rooms at the conference centre may be limited. Rooms are filled on a first come, first served basis!
  • If you need an invoice to complete your payment, please send an email to office@nern.nl, including ALL relevant details that should be mentioned on the invoice (e.g., purchase order no., specific addresses, attendees, etc.).
  • The Early-Bird policy is such that the moment of REGISTRATION (and not payment) is leading for determining the fee that applies to you.
  • Please make sure that your payment is arranged within two weeks after your registration.
  • It is the participant's responsibility to make sure that payment is completed correctly and in time.
 
NERN Cancellation Conditions
  • Up to 4 (four) weeks prior to the start of the event, cancellation is free of charge.
  • Up to 2 (two) weeks prior to the start of the event, a fee of € 50,- will be charged.
  • In case of cancellation within two weeks prior to the start of the event, a fee of € 100,- will be charged.
  • If you do not show at all, a fee of € 150,- will nevertheless be charged.

Note: If you would like to cancel your registration, ALWAYS inform us (and do note that you will be kept to the cancellation conditions).

 
NAEM Organising Committee
  • Merel Soons, Utrecht University (chair)
  • Dries Bonte, Ghent University
  • Chris Smit, University of Groningen
  • Annelies Veraart, Radboud University
  • Kenneth Rijsdijk, University of Amsterdam
  • Matty Berg, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam
  • Patrick Jansen, Wageningen University & Research
  • Hans ter Steege, Naturalis Biodiversity Center
  • Dedmer van de Waal, Netherlands Institute of Ecology
  • Johan van de Koppel, Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research
  • Nadia Soudzilovskaia, Leiden University
  • Lennart Suselbeek, Netherlands Ecological Research Network
  • Claudius van de Vijver, Netherlands Ecological Research Network
 
More information

Dr Claudius van de Vijver (NERN)
Phone: +31 (0) 317 485116
Email: claudius.vandevijver@wur.nl

Dr Lennart Suselbeek (NERN)
Phone: +31 (0) 317 485426
Email: lennart.suselbeek@wur.nl

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