NAEM 2020

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Netherlands Annual Ecology Meeting

Tuesday 11 & Wednesday 12 February 2020

Conference Centre "De Werelt", Westhofflaan 2, Lunteren, The Netherlands

 
Scope

Each year, on the second Tuesday and Wednesday of February, the Netherlands Ecological Research Network (NERN) organises her annual conference, the Netherlands Annual Ecology Meeting (NAEM). This conference is particularly geared towards people working in the field of ecology and/or evolution. It aims to strengthen the network of ecologists in the Netherlands, Belgium, and surrounding countries and provides an overview of the work carried out by the people in the network. The NAEM meeting is two full days, each day consisting of a plenary session, in which a Dutch/Flemish and an international world leader present their view on a specific topic in ecology or evolution, two sets of five parallel sessions (including more workshop-like sessions), and a poster session. Parallel sessions generally consists of 6 oral presentations, thus leading to a total of approximately 125 oral presentations. On average, we have about 75-100 scientific poster presentations during the meeting. On Tuesday evening, a more relaxed and thought-provoking presentation is generally scheduled. The NAEM meeting is organised in collaboration with the Dutch-Flemish Ecological Society (NecoV) and is financially supported by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO).

This year will be the 13th edition of the Netherlands Annual Ecology Meeting (NAEM). As always, the meeting will be held at Conference Centre "De Werelt" in Lunteren. At this stage, the four plenary speakers have been confirmed. The first plenary session will be about "Soil carbon dynamics in a changing world", with plenary talks by Prof. Henry Janzen of the Lethbridge Research and Development Centre, which is part of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, about "Storing carbon in managed lands: an ecosystem perspective", and by Prof. Rien Aerts of the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, about "Soil carbon dynamics in a changing climate". The second plenary session will be about "Chemical Communication", with plenary talks by Prof. Gabrielle Nevitt of the University of California, Davis, about "Following the scent of avian olfaction", and by Prof. Astrid Groot of the University of Amsterdam about "Natural and sexual selection on chemical communication signals in moths". More details about the general set-up of the programme and about the deadlines for submission of contributions to the 2020 NAEM meeting can be found below. You are cordially invited to register your participation.

Presenting a poster during the NAEM meeting

Besides the plenary and parallel sessions, time has been allotted to two poster sessions. Those wanting to present a poster, are asked to indicate this in the registration form on the website. It is possible for you to indicate in the registration form whether or not your poster should be linked to one of the parallel sessions. If so, we will ascertain that your poster is assigned to the poster session that is scheduled on the same day as the parallel session. If you change your plans after registering, please send an email to office@nern.nl to indicate that you will or will not be presenting a poster during the NAEM meeting, and if you will, be sure to give the title of your poster and to indicate whether it should be linked to one of the parallel sessions. Posters presented during the NAEM meeting have to be formatted in PORTRAIT ORIENTATION and in A0-size. At the end of the meeting, the best poster (as judged by the NAEM audience) will be selected and awarded with the NECOV Poster Prize. Deadline for submission of a poster title is: Friday 24 January 2020.

Other elements of the conference

Important deadlines
  • Deadline for submission of poster titles for a slot in one of the poster sessions: Friday 24 January 2020
  • Early-bird deadline for registration of participation: Friday 24 January 2020
 
Programme

Tuesday 11 February

  Main Entrance Hall
08:30 Registration and coffee in the Lounge and setting up posters
10:15 Word of Welcome
10:30 Plenary 1: “Chemical communication - Nature's universal language”
Chemical signals can be perceived by members of the same species, e.g. in the case of alarm, aggregation and sex pheromones, and by other species, such as predators, parasitoids and plants. Species may thus use these signals to find food and mates. To illustrate how chemical signals are shaped by natural and sexual selection, the plenary speakers will highlight their research on chemical signals used by birds to find food and chemical signals used by moths to find potential mates.
10:30 Following the scent of avian olfaction (Gabrielle Nevitt, Department of Neurobiology, Physiology and Behavior, University of California, Davis)
11.15 Natural and sexual selection on chemical communication signals in moths (Astrid Groot, Department of Evolutionary & Population Biology, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands)
12:00 Lunch in the restaurant
  Europe Hall America Hall Asia Hall Africa Hall Vide Hall
13:30 Parallel 1a:
Chemical communication - Nature's universal language
Parallel 1b:
TRENDS in Global Change Research
Parallel 1c:
Nitrogen in Ecosystems
Parallel 1d:
Marine Benthic Ecology
Parallel 1e:
WORKSHOP 1: Transfer your science into news (click to sign up!)
  Conveners:
  1. Thomas Blankers (Department of Evolutionary & Population Biology, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands)
  2. Alexander Haverkamp (Laboratory of Entomology, Wageningen University & Research)
Conveners:
  1. Sietze Norder (Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands)
  2. Alexandra van der Geer (Endless Forms, Naturalis Biodiversity Center, the Netherlands)
Conveners:
  1. Rik Veldhuis (GELIFES, University of Groningen, the Netherlands)
  2. Fons Smolders (Aquatic Ecology and Environmental Biology, Radboud University, the Netherlands)
Conveners:
  1. Anna de Kluijver (Geosciences, Utrecht University, the Netherlands)
  2. Tanja Stratmann (Geosciences, Utrecht University, the Netherlands / Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen, Germany)
  3. Martijn Bart (Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands)
Conveners:
  1. Froukje Rienks (Head of PR & Science Communications, NIOO-KNAW)
  2. Jac Niessen (Science Communications Officer, Wageningen University and Research)
  Chemical communication is crucial in the evolution and ecology of animals and plants, mediating many important interactions such as mating, foraging, and pollination. Yet, to the human observer these signals often remain hidden and elusive. This session will showcase examples of chemical communication, demonstrating the vital role these signals play in the interactions between individuals within and among species as well as across biological kingdoms. We therefore encourage talks on the mechanisms and diversity of communication signals across the field of chemical ecology. Ecosystem assemblage and species distributions are drastically modified by human activities. The aim of this session is to address both drivers and consequences of biodiversity change from local to global scales. In addition, we aim to place ecological changes in the Anthropocene within the context of deep-time ecological dynamics. Since last year the Dutch society has been in a nitrogen crisis. Critical nitrogen deposition loads are exceeded in most of our Natura 2000 areas. Nitrogen deposition causes eutrophication and acidification of the soil leading to a disturbed nutrient balance in the soil. The disturbed nutrient balance causes a cascading effect that alters the form and functioning of our natural areas. In this session we discuss the effects of nitrogen on soil microorganisms, plants and higher trophic levels. Marine benthic hotspots support high levels of biodiversity and provide many goods and services to society. However, many benthic ecosystems are threatened by anthropogenic activities and climate change. To predict and understand how benthic ecosystems respond to future conditions, knowledge on biogeochemical processes and ecological functioning are essential. This session aims to combine studies from organism to ecosystem level on various benthic ecosystems (e.g., seagrass beds, mangroves, reef-systems) for a broad interdisciplinary exchange. WORKSHOP STARTS AT 14:00 hrs: Good quality science remains the foundation. To be truly successful in a science career, however, it helps if you can also communicate your research to funders and lay public. How do you convey your main message in a press release or on the worldwide web? Bring your own article, dissertation or report, submerge in the role of science communicator and create at least a intriguing header and first paragraph that will make your science into news. Transforming science into readable news is a profession. However, this workshop will offer a crash course into the do’s and don’ts.
13:30 Understanding specificity in plant volatile signalling
(Silke Allmann, University of Amsterdam)
Ecological Dynamics in the Anthropocene and Quaternary
(Sietze Norder, University of Amsterdam / Universidade de Lisboa)
The impacts of atmospheric nitrogen deposition on natural and semi-natural ecosystems: an overview
(Roland Bobbink, B-Ware Research Centre)
Gold rush in the deep sea: Environmental impacts of polymetallic nodule extraction
(Tanja Stratmann, Utrecht University / Max Planck Institute for marine microbiology)

If you are interested in taking part in this workshop (aimed at all academic levels), please click here to sign up!

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13:50 Finding the needle in a haystack: molecules that elicit butterfly egg-killing in plants
(Nina Fatouros, Wageningen University)
Climate-driven range shift of migratory hosts facilitates avian influenza pandemic via crossroads of flyways
(Yanjie Xu, Wageningen University)
Mitigating the effects of N deposition in dry heathlands
(Maaike Weijters, B-Ware Research Centre)
Deep sea sponge grounds as biogeochemical hotspots
(Martijn Bart, University of Amsterdam / Anna de Kluijver, Utrecht University)
14:10 Microbial volatiles elicit differential olfactory responses in an aphid parasitoid and its hyperparasitoid
(Jetske de Boer, Netherlands Institute of Ecology)
Rapid thermophilization of forest understorey plant communities
(Sanne Govaert, Ghent University)
Linking nitrogen deposition, producer quality and fauna: what do we know, what can we expect?
(Joost Vogels, Bargerveen foundation / Radboud University)
Exploring different sponge engines in coral reefs: Processing of different types of dissolved organic matter (DOM) fuel by high and low microbial abundance sponges
(Sara Campana, University of Amsterdam)
14:30 Short Break
14:40 Doublesex and transformer shape sexual dimorphism in the Nasonia antennal lobe
(Aidan Williams, Wageningen University)
Deep Macroevolutionary Impact of Humans on New Zealand’s Unique Avifauna
(Rampal Etienne, University of Groningen)
The effects of abiotic measures and fungi on regeneration of Juniperus communis
(Rik Veldhuis, University of Groningen)
Unravelling foreshore ecosystem dynamics: applications for ecosystem-based coastal defense
(Beatriz Marin-Diaz, Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research)
15:00 Condition dependence of female choosiness
(Naomi Zweerus, University of Amsterdam)
Arthropods in a warming Arctic: new predictors for their advancing phenology
(Mikhail Zhemchuzhnikov, Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research)
Interactive effects of warming and eutrophication on methane cycling communities in shallow lakes
(Thomas Nijman, Radboud University)
Scale-dependent functional patterns in the marine benthos
(Olivier Beauchard, Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research)
15:20 Chemical warfare – The role of chemical signals in mosquito ecology and vector control
(Jeroen Spitzen, Wageningen University)
Mitigating and adaptive strategies for eutrophication management towards a sustainable Anthropocene
(Manqi Chang, Netherlands Institute of Ecology)
Resilience to high N deposition in Grey dunes (H2130): interactions between pH, P nutrition, plant mycorrhizal strategies and soil community composition
(Annemieke Kooijman, University of Amsterdam)
Wadden Mosaic: Understanding the ecological functioning of the subtidal Wadden Sea
(Oscar Franken, University of Groningen / Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research)
15:40 Coffee and tea in the lounge
  Europe Hall America Hall Asia Hall Africa Hall  
16:00 Parallel 2a:
Movement Ecology
Parallel 2b:
TRENDS in Microbiome Research
Parallel 2c:
Ecology and Conservation
Parallel 2d:
Virus Ecology
 
  Conveners:
  1. Casper van Leeuwen (Aquatic Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology, the Netherlands)
  2. Allert Bijleveld (Coastal Systems, Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, the Netherlands)
Conveners:
  1. Ben Oyserman (Microbial Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology, the Netherlands)
  2. Viviane Cordovez (Institute Biology Leiden, University of Leiden, the Netherlands)
Conveners:
  1. Ignas Heitkönig (Resource Ecology, Wageningen University & Research, the Netherlands)
  2. Rascha Nuijten (Animal Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology, the Netherlands)
Conveners:
  1. Simone Weidner (Microbial Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology, the Netherlands)
  2. Adam Ossowicki (Microbial Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology, the Netherlands)
  3. Jan Dirk van Elsas (Microbial Ecology, University of Groningen, the Netherlands)
 
  Movement is a key process in ecology, affecting the life history of individuals, populations, communities and ecosystem dynamics. Rapid technological progress in understanding organism movement coincides with a growing need to understand the movement capacity of species facing global changes (e.g. habitat fragmentation, warming, pollution, eutrophication). This session will bring together people studying movement ability and movement requirements of organisms in relation to changing environments. We welcome submissions on all species, habitat types and spatial scales. Microbiomes have an outsized impact both on a global and local scale. At the global level, microbiomes are one of the primary drivers of ecosystem function and contribute significantly to cycling of nutrients such as nitrogen. On a local scale, microbiome interactions with host organisms may increase the adaptability of the host to stressors such as drought or disease, with direct implications for conservation and movement ecology. This session aims to 1) develop an interdisciplinary exchange of ideas and methods between researchers that investigate the role of microbiomes in ecosystem function and host adaptability, and 2) connect plant and animal researchers with microbiologists to better understand the role of the microbiomes in plant or animal adaptability to global change and stress. In the current time of rapid global change, application of ecological research is of increasing importance. Biodiversity is under severe threat in many areas of the world and the call for action is becoming stronger. In this session we (1) highlight examples of ecological research that have a positive impact on the conservation of a species, habitat or ecosystem, and (2) explore avenues of increasing the impact of ecological research to halt biodiversity declines and ecological degradation. Viruses are ubiquitous on Earth, with profound implications for host fitness and ecosystem function as well as for crop, lifestock and human health. Much is known from particular disciplines such as aquatic microbiology and plant pathology, while new research frontiers are emerging in other systems, such as the soil. This session will foster exchange between these perspectives and integration with broader ecological research. All submissions that consider viruses in their ecological context are welcomed.  
16:00 Explaining changes in annual cycle movements in response to climate change
(Christiaan Both, University of Groningen)
Linking host genotype and microbiome
(Ben Oyserman, Netherlands Institute of Ecology)
Conservation attention necessary across at least 44% of Earth's terrestrial area to safeguard biodiversity
(James Allan, University of Amsterdam)
Computational and experimental approaches to determine bacteriophage host-range
(Bas Dutilh, Utrecht University)
 
16:20 Bill length and sex shapes diet, fuel deposition and migration timing in a long-distance migrant
(Thomas Lameris, Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research)
Combined effects of light and nutrient availability on freshwater macrophyte quality and its associated microbial biofilm
(Mandy Velthuis, Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries)
The afterlife of wood
(Shanshan Yang, Wageningen University)
Warming advances virus population dynamics in a temperate freshwater plankton community
(Dedmer van de Waal, Netherlands Institute of Ecology)
 
16:40 Barnacle geese rapidly adjust migratory habits to climate change through social learning
(Thomas Oudman, University of St Andrews)
Wheat rhizosphere bacterial communities and protection against soil-borne pathogen
(Lilian S. Abreu S. Costa, Embrapa Environment, Brazil)
Mitigating salamander declines: disentangling the mechanisms driving population persistence and disease invasion
(Jesse Erens, Ghent University)
The dynamics and diversity of the mycosphere virome
(Akbar Adjie Pratama, University of Groningen)
 
17:00 Short Break
17:10 Collective spatial segregation between non territorial central-place foragers
(Geert Aarts, Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research)
Can we find clues in the fecal microbiome of laying chickens that we can relate to exposure to wild birds and their potential pathogens?
(Janneke Schreuder, Utrecht University)
The impact of protected areas and derogation shooting on the foraging behaviour of barnacle geese in Friesland, Netherlands: a modelling study
(Monique de Jager, Netherlands Institute of Ecology)
Phylogeographic and phylodynamic approaches to explore viral ecology
(Sebastian Lequime, KU Leuven)
 
17:30 Spatiotemporal variation in disturbance impacts derived from combined tracking of aircraft and shorebirds
(Henk-Jan van der Kolk, Netherlands Institute of Ecology)
Seasonal variation in the gut microbiome of homing pigeons
(Maurine W. Dietz, University of Groningen)
Contrasting microclimates among hedgerows and woodlands across temperate Europe
(Thomas Vanneste, Ghent University)
Here to stay: Usutu virus activity in the Netherlands
(Henk van der Jeugd, Netherlands Institute of Ecology)
 
17:50 Observing and modeling regional migratory patterns of birds using meteorological radar
(Bart Kranstauber, University of Amsterdam)
Speeding-up nature restoration with soil microbiome steering: a case study of bottom-up and top-down regulation of microbial communities
(Elly Morriën, University of Amsterdam)
What can we learn from the Chinese dryland restoration projects?
(Yanning Qiu, Wageningen University)
A new virus of Arabidopsis widespread in geographically dispersed ecotypes
(René van der Vlugt, Wageningen University)
 
18:10 Drinks in the Lounge and from 18:30 onwards dinner in the restaurant
19:30 Poster session 1
21:00 Evening Programme: Will follow soon
 
 
Wednesday 12 February
 
07:30 Breakfast in the restaurant
08:00 Registration for those coming on Day 2 only
  Europe Hall America Hall Asia Hall Africa Hall  
08:30 Parallel 3a:
Herbivores and Ecosystem Dynamics
Parallel 3b:
TRENDS in Eco-Evo Dynamics
Parallel 3c:
Network Analysis in Ecology
Parallel 3d:
Plastics in the Environment
 
  Conveners:
  1. Judith Sitters (Department Biology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium)
  2. Ciska Veen (Terrestrial Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology, the Netherlands)
Conveners:
  1. Aafke Oldenbeuving (Pollinator Ecology, Naturalis Biodiversity Center, the Netherlands)
  2. Jelle Zandveld (Institute for Interdisciplinary Studies, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands)
  3. Joost van den Heuvel (Laboratory of Genetics, Wageningen University & Research, the Netherlands)
Conveners:
  1. Pariya Behrouzi (Biometris, Wageningen University & Research, the Netherlands)
  2. Romain Frelat (Aquaculture and Fisheries, Wageningen University & Research, the Netherlands)
  3. Lia Hemerik (Biometris, Wageningen University & Research, the Netherlands)
Conveners:
  1. Oscar Franken (Department of Ecological Science, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, the Netherlands)
  2. Esperanza Huerta Lwanga (Environmental Science, Wageningen University & Research, the Netherlands)
 
  Herbivores are major drivers of the structure and functioning of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. They exert strong influences on plant communities, nutrient cycles and soil/water properties, which all have an impact on the ecology of other organisms and ecosystem processes. This session aims to bring scientists together who are working on a range of herbivores, from invertebrates to elephants, and their impacts on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. In nature organisms adapt to all environmental selection pressures that are encountered. While one selection pressure increases a trait, another might decrease it, leading to optimal life histories. Similar phenomena exist at the individual species level for physiological and / or genetic trade-offs. This session aims to discuss the trends in evolutionary dynamics by comparing the dynamics on different levels of organisation. Networks are a powerful tool to represent complex realities and network analysis is applied in a large diversity of fields in ecology, with for example protein networks, pollination networks or food webs. Understanding the structure of networks can help revealing stabilizing mechanisms of communities. This theme session provides an opportunity to examine recent methodological advances in as well as new applications of network analysis in ecology. Plastic pollution has recently gained a lot of media attention. Yet, the effects these plastics may have in both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems are still largely unknown. Breakdown of larger particles can result in the formation of micro- and nano-plastics, which may affect species in direct and indirect ways. This session aims at bringing together and synthesizing the current ecological knowledge on the effects of plastic pollution in a wide range of ecosystems.  
08:30 Will follow soon
(Liesbeth Bakker, Netherlands Institute of Ecology)
Eco-evolutionary dynamics across scales in a fast-changing world
(Martijn Egas, University of Amsterdam)
A biogeochemical network analysis of a common deep-sea sponge
(Anna de Kluijver, Utrecht University)
Plastics in the environment – Session introduction and overview
(Oscar Franken, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam & Esperanza Huerta Lwanga, Wageningen University)
 
08:50 Anthropogenic fear landscapes influence tree recruitment and tick distribution
(Bjorn Mols, University of Groningen)
Coping with the present while preparing for the future: developmental plasticity in bulb mite weapons
(Flor Rhebergen, University of Amsterdam)
Carbon processing differs between sandy and silty sites at Bourgneuf Bay
(Tanja Stratmann, Utrecht University / MPI for Marine Microbiology)
Effects of plastic mulch film residues on wheat growth and rhizosphere microbiome
(Yueling Qi, Wageningen University)
 
09:10 The importance of climatic extremes on plant-insect herbivore interactions
(Jeff Harvey, Netherlands Institute of Ecology)
Long-term community dynamics in bacterial ecosystems
(Sijmen Schoustra, Wageningen University)
Integrating qualitative and quantitative descriptors reveals temporal dynamics of food web
(Romain Frelat, Wageningen University)
Exploring the impacts of polyester fibers and tire wear particles on soil invertebrates
(Salla Selonen, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam)
 
09:30 Short Break
09:40 Large herbivores and palms structure soil nutrient cycling in a neotropical frugivore dominated rainforest
(Nacho Villar, Universidade Estadual Paulista / Netherlands Institute of Ecology)
Adaptation and adaptive control in periods of environmental change
(Tom Van Dooren, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique / Sorbonne University / Naturalis Biodiversity Center)
Evaluating stability of energy-flux food-web models
(Daniëlle de Jonge, Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research / University of Groningen)
Assessing the Fate of Marine Plastics: Colonization and density change
(Erik Zetter, Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research / Utrecht University)
 
10:00 Impediments affect deer foraging decisions and sapling performance
(Annelies van Ginkel, University of Groningen)
Functional traits shape liana strategies and niches
(Qi Liu, Wageningen University)
Microbial network analysis – where do we stand?
(Karoline Faust, KU Leuven)
Accumulation, distribution and composition characteristics of macro-micro plastic particles in different mulching farmlands, Northwest China
(Fanrong Meng, Wageningen University)
 
10:20 Zooplankton grazing efficiency is mediated by shelter: an enclosure study on the Marker Wadden
(Hui Jin, Netherlands Institute of Ecology)
Resonance revisited: life-history evolution and food web stability in fluctuating environments
(Charlotte de Vries, University of Zürich)
Learning from microbial association networks through clusters and conserved patterns
(Lisa Röttjers, KU Leuven)
Plastic mulch in agriculture: the case of low density polyethylene and its interactions with pesticides and soil microbiota
(Nicolas Beriot, Wageningen University)
 
10:40 Coffee and tea in the lounge
11:00 Poster Session 2
12:30 Lunch in the restaurant
  Europe Hall America Hall Asia Hall Africa Hall Vide Hall
13:30 Parallel 4a:
Soil Organic Matter in a changing environment
Parallel 4b:
TRENDS in Biodiversity Research
Parallel 4c:
Recent Advances and Critical Topics in Reproductive Biology
Parallel 4d:
Ecology of Social Behaviour
Parallel 4e:
WORKSHOP 2: Transfer your science into news (click to sign up!)
  Conveners:
  1. Maaike van Agtmaal (Louis Bolk Institute, the Netherlands)
  2. Mariet Hefting (Ecology & Biodiversity, Utrecht University, the Netherlands)
Conveners:
  1. Patrick Jansen (Resource Ecology, Wageningen University & Research, the Netherlands)
  2. Koos Biesmeijer (Pollinator Ecology, Naturalis Biodiversity Center, the Netherlands)
Conveners:
  1. Melissah Rowe (Animal Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology, the Netherlands)
  2. Lyanne Brouwer (Animal Ecology and Physiology, Radboud University, the Netherlands)
  3. Yumi Nakadera (Department of Ecological Science, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, the Netherlands)
  4. Joris M. Koene (Department of Ecological Science, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, the Netherlands)
Conveners:
  1. Martijn Hammers (GELIFES, University of Groningen, the Netherlands)
  2. Sjouke Kingma (Animal Behaviour, Wageningen University & Research, the Netherlands)
Conveners:
  1. Aafke Kok, Gert van Maanen & Steijn van Schie (editors Bionieuws, the Dutch biweekly for biologists)
  Soil organic matter (SOM) is crucial in many soil-associated ecosystem services. SOM facilitates water retention, nutrient cycling, greenhouse gas mitigation and structural stability of soils. Climate change and land use intensification have major impacts on SOM stability and composition, due to direct changes in environmental conditions and indirect changes in vegetation. This session welcomes research from both natural and managed systems on SOM dynamics in a changing world in relation to soil ecosystems services. Decline of biodiversity has quickly developed into one of the most urgent problems of our time, and has been identified as an urgent threat by the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES). The Netherlands, with its high human population density and its intense agriculture and polluting industries, is one of the countries in which these problems are relatively prominent. This session deals with research on trends in biodiversity. Talks may cover recent discoveries, methods, technologies and approaches in biodiversity research, including both the measurement of trends, the identification of the underlying drivers, and the evaluation of potential solutions. Knowledge of reproductive biology is crucial to our understanding of organismal ecology and evolution. Such knowledge is particularly pertinent in modern times given that rapid environmental changes, such as increasing temperatures and urbanization, are negatively impacting biodiversity on a global scale. This session aims to highlight recent advances in our knowledge of reproductive tactics and processes with a particular focus on understudied taxa, as well highlight the impacts of environmental change on reproductive traits related to fitness in order to stimulate research on these topics. Most organisms live in a social environment, and many aspects of their lives are affected by social interactions. Studying how ecological conditions affect cooperation and conflict between individuals is important for understanding life-history evolution, population dynamics and conservation. This session aims to discuss (1) how ecological conditions shape social behaviour and (2) highlight the importance of considering social behaviour in ecological studies. WORKSHOP STARTS AT 14:00 hrs: Good quality science remains the foundation. To be truly successful in a science career, however, it helps if you can also communicate your research to funders and lay public. How do you convey your main message in a press release or on the worldwide web? Bring your own article, dissertation or report, submerge in the role of science communicator and create at least a intriguing header and first paragraph that will make your science into news. Transforming science into readable news is a profession. However, this workshop will offer a crash course into the do’s and don’ts.
13:30 Global mycorrhizal plant distribution linked to terrestrial carbon stocks
(Nadejda Soudzilovskaia, Leiden University)
Flower-rich dikes as a valuable habitat for wild bees; a case study from the river Waal, the Netherlands
(Constant Swinkels, Radboud University)
Reproductive ruin in the modern world?
(Melissah Rowe, Netherlands Institute of Ecology)
Ecology of social behaviour
(Martijn Hammers, University of Groningen)

If you are interested in taking part in this workshop (aimed at all academic levels), please click here to sign up!

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13:50 Ectomycorrhizal necromass decomposition: how interactions between cell wall chemical components affect the degradation process.
(Riccardo Mancinelli, Leiden University)
Aerial arthropod abundance and diversity in strip cropping systems
(Fogelina Cuperus, Wageningen University)
Mechanisms underlying the seasonal onset of reproduction in a wild songbird
(Melanie Lindner, Netherlands Institute of Ecology / University of Groningen)
Neurogenetic dissection of group formation: integrating cues from food, friends and foes
(Thomas Verschut, University of Groningen)
14:10 How local and continental drivers influence carbon stocks in forest edges across Europe.
(Camille Meeuwsen, Ghent University)
Fine-scale habitat niches of wetland birds derived from country-wide Airborne Laser Scanning data
(Zsófia Koma, University of Amsterdam)
Temperatures that sterilise males predict global distributions of Drosophila species
(Steven Parratt, University of Liverpool)
Habitat fragmentation affects group living in an Afrotropical cooperative breeder
(Laurence Cousseau, Ghent University)
14:30 Short break
14:40 Sensitivity of labile carbon fractions to tillage and organic matter management and their potential as comprehensive soil quality indicators across pedoclimatic conditions in Europe
(Giulia Bongiorno, Wageningen University)
Analysis of a coastal North Sea fish community: comparison of aquatic environmental DNA concentrations to fish catches
(Judith van Bleijswijk, Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research)
Mate choice and reproductive success in a warming planet
(Valentina Zizzari, University of Koblenz-Landau)
Love thy neighbour, or not? – Spatial variation of density-dependent nest success in Eurasian oystercatcher
(Magali Frauendorf, Netherlands Institute of Ecology & Centre for Avian Population Studies)
15:00 Degradation of SOM in cultivated peat soils, why is there no stabilization?
(Mariet Hefting, Utrecht University)
Application of metabarcoding to determine the contribution of arthropod taxa to avian diets: validation with recorded diets
(Yvonne I. Verkuil, University of Groningen)
Complex effects of multisensory pollution on sexual communication
(Andrew Cronin, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam)
Recipient directed food calls in chimpanzees
(Anne Marijke Schel, Utrecht University)
15:20 Organic matter in peatlands: effects of land use and management measures
(Joachim Deru, Louis Bolk Institute)
Towards open biodiversity data
(Niels Raes, Netherlands Biodiversity Information Facility)
The mediating role of the placenta in antidepressant exposure in the live-bearing fish family Poeciliidae
(Laura Staal, University of Groningen)
Communal breeding and cooperation in Seychelles warblers is associated with nest predation risk, not survival benefits and food availability
(Sjouke Anne Kingma, Wageningen University)
15:40 Coffee and tea in the lounge
16:00 Plenary 2: "Soil Carbon Dynamics in a Changing World"
We show how the global carbon cycle has changed due to changes in land management and climate change. These changes have a severe impact on atmospheric carbon concentrations and thus feed back on the global climate. Next, we explore how land management and natural processes can help to increase soil carbon storage and thereby mitigate climate change. Ecological knowledge of the underlying processes is pivotal to do this successfully, but this cannot be achieved without involving economists and social scientists.
16:00 Storing carbon in managed lands: an ecosystem perspective (Henry Janzen, Lethbridge Research and Development Centre, part of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada)
16.45 Soil carbon dynamics in a changing climate (Rien Aerts, Department of Ecological Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, the Netherlands)
17:30 Awards and Closing Ceremony
18:00 Farewell drinks
18:30 Dinner and NERN board meeting
19:30 End / Travel Home (Shuttle available between Conference Centre and Lunteren Station)

 

Fees 1

 
  EARLY-BIRD FEE 2 REGULAR FEE 2
MSc students / PhD candidates (2 days, with Bed & Breakfast) € 180,- € 215,-
Others (2 days, with Bed & Breakfast) € 210,- € 250,-
Single room surcharge €   50,- €   50,-
MSc students / PhD candidates (2 days, without Bed & Breakfast) € 160,- € 190,-
Others (2 days, without Bed & Breakfast) € 185,- € 220,-
MSc students / PhD candidates (1-day visitor) € 110,- € 135,-
Others (1-day visitor) € 130,- € 155,-

1 The participation fee includes coffee/tea/water, lunches, and dinners.
2 The Early-Bird Fee applies to anyone who REGISTERS ON OR BEFORE 24 JANUARY 2020 

Note:

  • Availability of hotel rooms at the conference centre may be limited. Rooms are filled on a first come, first served basis!
  • If you need an invoice to complete your payment, please send an email to office@nern.nl, including ALL relevant details that should be mentioned on the invoice (e.g., purchase order no., specific addresses, attendees, etc.).
  • The Early-Bird policy is such that the moment of REGISTRATION (and not payment) is leading for determining the fee that applies to you.
  • Please make sure that your payment is arranged within two weeks after your registration.
  • It is the participant's responsibility to make sure that payment is completed correctly and in time.
 
NERN Cancellation Conditions
  • Up to 4 (four) weeks prior to the start of the event, cancellation is free of charge.
  • Up to 2 (two) weeks prior to the start of the event, a fee of € 50,- will be charged.
  • In case of cancellation within two weeks prior to the start of the event, a fee of € 100,- will be charged.
  • If you do not show at all, a fee of € 150,- will nevertheless be charged.

Note: If you would like to cancel your registration, ALWAYS inform us (and do note that you will be kept to the cancellation conditions).

 
NAEM Organising Committee
  • Merel Soons, Utrecht University (chair)
  • Dries Bonte, Ghent University
  • Chris Smit, University of Groningen
  • Annelies Veraart, Radboud University
  • Kenneth Rijsdijk, University of Amsterdam
  • Matty Berg, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam
  • Patrick Jansen, Wageningen University & Research
  • Hans ter Steege, Naturalis Biodiversity Center
  • Dedmer van de Waal, Netherlands Institute of Ecology
  • Johan van de Koppel, Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research
  • Nadia Soudzilovskaia, Leiden University
  • Lennart Suselbeek, Netherlands Ecological Research Network
  • Claudius van de Vijver, Netherlands Ecological Research Network
 
More information

Dr Claudius van de Vijver (NERN)
Phone: +31 (0) 317 485116
Email: claudius.vandevijver@wur.nl

Dr Lennart Suselbeek (NERN)
Phone: +31 (0) 317 485426
Email: lennart.suselbeek@wur.nl

Registration

To register, please enter your details below and click "Register".

Personal details
Details about your participation

We ask you to indicate your gender, so that we can ensure that you will be sharing a room with someone of the same gender